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Boston park will ‘Sparkle & Chime’ with Shepley art installation

Friday, 15 August 2014

Sparkle & Chime art installation

It’s dusk on an evening in October, and as you walk through Evans Way Park in Boston’s Fenway, you are accompanied by ethereal chiming and shimmering reflections in the trees above you.

The Fenway Alliance selected Sparkle & Chime, designed by architect Jean Kim of Shepley Bulfinch, as the audiovisual installation at Evans Way Park for several weeks in October. The installation is part of the Fenway Alliance’s 13th annual Opening Our Doors, which will be held on October 13.

Every year for the past 12 years, Opening Our Doors has welcomed the public to experience ...[more]

Using graphics and storytelling to explain abstract concepts

Wednesday, 15 January 2014

Brigham Bldg for FutureOne of an occasional series

Designers can easily read architectural drawings and imagine the spaces they represent, but for others who don’t spend their days looking at plans, it can be difficult to translate from two-dimensional lines to 3-D space.

Because the spatial and experiential implications of drawings may not be apparent to clients, their donors, and community members, storytelling plays an important role in explaining the impact of a design by conveying a sense of the experience. By using narrative storytelling, graphic rendering, and photography ...[more]

Design competition finalist makes a place for community

Thursday, 21 March 2013

flintWhat can you come up with to transform a parking lot into a community gathering place, in the face of financial and logistical constraints? That was the challenge facing design teams in the Flat Lot competition in Flint, Michigan. “Knot Lot,” a Shepley Bulfinch team submission, was chosen as one of five finalists from among 221 entries in the competition, which was sponsored by the Flint (Michigan) Public Art Project and the Flint chapter of the AIA.  Knot Lot and other top entries will be part of an exhibition opening in Flint on April 14.

Organizers asked designers ...[more]

The power of narrative

Tuesday, 19 June 2012

A significant part of our practice as architects is to convey abstract, mostly visual design concepts in ways that make them accessible to a wide range of people, most of whom are not fluent in architectural drawing conventions. We are so focused on visual representation that we are often shocked when the audience does not understand the basic experiential qualities of the spaces we are trying to convey.

How can we help clients and future users understand what it will be like to interact within a building that only ...[more]

A theory for open building

Monday, 5 December 2011

Why do buildings last? How do we design flexible spaces that can change and adapt? 

A team from Shepley took on this question as part of the Open Building conference at Build Boston last month. The conference tasked three firms – Shepley, Payette, and Cannon – to propose a building that would evolve over time to house multiple uses on a large scale site in Somerville. We took the long historical view and, after a week of exhaustive debate, found that architectural systems which are designed to change rarely work or ...[more]

In defense of good design

Tuesday, 8 November 2011

What is the value of design? Businesses and institutions struggle with this question on a regular basis as they weigh concerns about budget, timing, and a variety of other factors against the priority of design. Several organizations, like Apple Computer, have seen the benefit of prioritizing design, and have made it a part of their core message.

As the this Oct. 10 New York Times article points out, good design can have a powerful impact on the urban landscape. One city, New York, has lately taken the initiative to prioritize good design in new public buildings. As architects, we take the advantages of strong design for granted. How can ...[more]

Discovery and delight: Tad Jusczyk’s long road to Venice

Tuesday, 1 November 2011

Tad Jusczyk gave everyone at Shepley a remarkable new perspective as he journeyed from Xi’an to Venice this past summer as Shepley Bulfinch’s inaugural Howe Traveling Fellow. As Tad traveled we shared his discoveries and observations on his blog, The Long Road to Venice. Since his return, they have enriched our design dialogue.

His journeys were also documented in Tour de Force, a Boston Society of Architects’ online feature and slideshow.

The Howe Traveling Fellowship is a grant for travel and exploration for Shepley Bulfinch staff, supported by the firm to honor ...[more]

Consider the corridor: lessons from architectural history

Wednesday, 23 February 2011

As architects, we often take the seemingly banal decisions that we make for granted. However, many of the devices that we employ carry social and historical implications that have had a profound effect on the way humans function. Corridors were not an inevitability. Often overlooked in the grand sweep of architectural history, they have had an enormous impact on the way we live, work, and communicate.

Despite their ubiquity today, corridors did not exist until the late 17th century, and were only first widely used in the 19th century. Before their ...[more]