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Duke University’s Rubenstein Library awarded LEED Gold Certification

Thursday, 29 October 2015

LEED 2015 GOLD medallion 150x150Duke University’s Rubenstein Library, which was dedicated in October following a two-year restoration and renovation, has received LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) Gold Certification from the US Green Building Council. It is the third Duke library project to be LEED Certified and the University’s seventh LEED Gold Certified building. The project’s most visible sustainable strategy was preserving the library building – one of the oldest academic structures on Duke’s West Campus – and elements of its 1948 and 1968 additions.

Preserving the building while preparing a new home for ...[more]

Deconstructing storage: creating safe spaces for physical collections

16 June 2015

SLA 2015 - Special Libraries Association annual conference, Boston, MA

Janette Blackburn, AIA, Principal, Shepley Bulfinch

Adaptive reuse and salvaging rare building materials

12 March 2008

Traditional Building Conference - Boston, MA

Sara Elsa-Beech, Shepley Bulfinch

Shepley Bulfinch Completes New Cabell Library at Virginia Commonwealth University

Monday, 3 October 2016

Virginia Commonwealth University New Landmark Library VCU Cabell Library Library Journal

New building defines the academic library of the future, receives first place award from Library Journal

BOSTON – September 29, 2016 - Shepley Bulfinch, a national architecture firm known for design excellence and innovation with offices in Boston, Houston and Phoenix, today announced the completion of the James Branch Cabell Library at Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU), a public research university in Richmond, Virginia. VCU’s newly expanded and renovated Cabell Library includes 156,000 sf of new construction and improvements to existing library space in the Monroe Park Campus library, providing VCU’s 31,000 ...[more]

Planning for Collections: Balancing Digital Trends, Physical Realities, and Pedagogy

Monday, 29 August 2016

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Digital technologies, changing scholarship habits, spatial constraints, and economic challenges are prompting many institutions to dramatically change how their physical collections (e.g., books, maps, art, biological samples, pottery fragments) are stored, accessed, displayed, and consumed. With the digital revolution, what physical things still are important pedagogically for an academic institution? That is what I explored with Janette Blackburn, principal at Shepley Bulfinch; Paul Guenther, Senior Campus Planner for McGill University, and Anna Gold, Dean of Library Services at Cal Poly, at our SCUP-51 conference presentation in Vancouver.

Leaders of higher education face decisions about ...[more]

Mid-Century libraries: obsolescence or opportunity?

Thursday, 7 April 2016

Angela Watson, AIAWhile the library’s importance to higher education has remained constant, its physical shape has changed dramatically over the course of the last century.

19th century academic libraries reflected the pedagogy and culture of the period: formal buildings with grand spaces and quiet, well-appointed reading rooms. By the middle of the 20th century these buildings faced a new challenge. Unable to respond to cultural shifts, rapid enrollment and collections growth, many of them were abandoned to other programs or demolished, making room for the new “library of the future.” These 20th century “state of ...[more]

Rural Studio’s enduring lessons

Monday, 11 August 2014

It’s not all about you.

That was the first lesson I learned in architecture school. Kicking off my architectural education at Auburn with the Rural Studio showed me the power of selfless design and taught me other invaluable life and professional lessons. For more than 20 years, the Rural Studio program has given architecture students like me a hands-on education, designing and building homes and community structures for underserved communities in rural Alabama.

Looking back, I can define my experience in five simple lessons:

It’s about your client. A lot of people go through school, believing that they are working on ‘their’ projects. Presentations and critiques can get very personal, with a lot ...[more]

Salem State University Library’s first student tour

Friday, 13 September 2013

Salem State's Admissions AmbassadorsIn August, Salem State’s Berry Library staff gave their student Admissions Ambassadors a tour of the new building. This is what they had to say:

The new library on Salem State campus is more of a head-turner than most might expect from an institution that harbors books and is used for studying. The admissions ambassadors group was brought on a special tour during our training; the excitement was shared throughout the group. Everything from the view to the seating and study rooms were nothing less than amazing. Unlike the temporary ...[more]