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Wabash College breaks ground on student housing project

Friday, 23 May 2014

Construction is now underway at Wabash College for a new 136-bed student housing complex on the College’s Crawfordsville, Indiana, campus. The $15 million plan includes the construction of two 38-bed halls, two 16-bed lodges, and two duplex-style townhomes with 12 beds each. Shepley Bulfinch designed the six-building complex.

The new housing, which will be sited along the campus’ west side, includes increased parking and links to the main campus through walkways and landscaping.

“We are excited about the development of the near west side of campus and the expansion of student housing options,” said President Gregory D. Hess. “The new residences represent careful planning and long conversations with students, faculty, staff and ...[more]

Jonathan Baron named director at Shepley Bulfinch

Monday, 17 March 2014

Jonathan BaronJonathan Baron has been named a Director at Shepley Bulfinch, where he is one of the leaders of the firm’s national practice.

“Jonathan’s broad knowledge of high-performance building design and delivery has been a tremendous resource to his colleagues, our practice and to our clients,” said Shepley Bulfinch president Carole Wedge.

He has led a number of academic library projects through complex renovations and additions, including projects for George Mason University, Cal Poly, and the seven-phase renovation of Princeton University’s Firestone Library.

He has contributed to articles on building performance and sustainability that have ...[more]

Dartmouth-Hitchcock cited as exemplar of flexible design

Tuesday, 1 November 2011

Shepley Bulfinch’s design of Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center is cited as a model of how to design for flexible implementation in Richard De Neufville’s new book, Flexibility in Engineering Design, published by MIT Press in September. The original design of the medical center, which opened in 1991, enabled subsequent vertical and horizontal expansion.

The book offers a high-level overview of why flexibility in design is needed to deliver significantly increased value. It describes in detail methods to identify, select, and implement useful flexibility. For Dartmouth-Hitchcock, that meant development and execution of a ...[more]

Consider the corridor: lessons from architectural history

Wednesday, 23 February 2011

As architects, we often take the seemingly banal decisions that we make for granted. However, many of the devices that we employ carry social and historical implications that have had a profound effect on the way humans function. Corridors were not an inevitability. Often overlooked in the grand sweep of architectural history, they have had an enormous impact on the way we live, work, and communicate.

Despite their ubiquity today, corridors did not exist until the late 17th century, and were only first widely used in the 19th century. Before their ...[more]

Affordable housing development in greater Boston

Wednesday, 23 February 2011

Shepley Bulfinch is proud to be a sponsor of the 11th Annual Greater Boston Affordable Housing Develop-ment Competition.

The competition is designed to focus a new generation of thinkers on the availability and affordability of housing in Massachusetts and the role of housing density in addressing issues of sprawl and community vitality.

This year’s competition matches graduate students from two or more schools with faculty advisors, development professionals, and mentors in architecture and finance. Over a two-month period, each team will produce an affordable housing development plan tailored to a specific site.

Several ...[more]

Science design: Use a starting point to measure success

Thursday, 28 October 2010

It may sound counterintuitive, but the most important thing about designing science and research facilities doesn’t actually involve design. The only way to plan for a future facility is to give a long hard look at the way you work today.

It’s a little like looking at your eating habits and stepping on the scale when you want to get in shape. It’s not easy. Start by:

- Establishing a vision and a set of quantifiable goals that will support it
- Understanding where you are today, evaluating existing facilities and current processes and ...[more]

LEED Gold for Lovett School

Wednesday, 28 July 2010

The Lovett School’s Portman Middle School in Atlanta has received LEED Gold certification from the US Green Building Council in recognition of the school’s highly sustainable design and construction.

The project’s highly sustainable attributes include a green roof, which features an outdoor classroom and demonstration garden for water harvesting; a water collection and recycling program; the use of rapidly renewable materials; the recycling of construction waste; and a “Building Dashboard.” In addition to its LEED Gold certification, the project has earned an Energy Star rating from the US Environmental Protection Agency and ...[more]

What does the future hold for LEED?

Thursday, 1 July 2010

There’s been a lot of discussion lately about changes to LEED. Are new credentialing requirements too complicated and cumbersome? Are the efforts of the USGBC to focus on energy efficiency in the new version of LEED enough to ensure green buildings are truly green? Everyone seems to be waiting to see what changes recently introduced by the USGBC mean for the future of LEED. Let’s step aside from all of that for a moment and look an outside influence that may be more important.

A draft of the International Green Construction Code (IGCC) ...[more]