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Strategic flexibility: phasing for uncertainty

Saturday, 10 January 2015

One of an occasional series

Phased development can be a practical approach to project planning for a number of reasons, including financial, strategic, and operational flexibility.

Building a new facility in rational phases and allowing future occupants to fit out their own spaces is a strategy often used in the commercial development that institutions can adopt.

Many clients know they will need expanded facilities in the future, but cannot determine specific funding streams at planning outset with any certainty. Often, having additional space will open up new program opportunities such as research grants. Building generic core and shell space that can flex in the future allows institutions to react to the ebbs and ...[more]

Work-life flexibility – banishing a ‘culture of busy’

18 October 2014

Equity By Design, San Francisco, CA

Carole Wedge, FAIA, LEED AP, Shepley Bulfinch
Francis Pitts, FAIA, Architecture+
Jenny Guan, AIA, LEED AP, Flad Architects, moderator

Plan for change: future flexibility in OR design

Monday, 28 September 2015

Hybrid OR, Banner Health - University Medical Ctr TucsonScaling up in size, incorporating hybrid technologies, and designing for future flexibility are three aspects that Shepley Bulfinch’s Mario Vieira, David Meek, and Srey Sherman talk about in “Ready for the cutting edge” in the latest issue of Healthcare Design magazine. The article includes a reference to Shepley Bulfinch’s two hybrid ORs completed by the firm as part of a recent surgical services renovation at Banner Health’s University Medical Center in Tucson.

David Meek also discusses mock-ups and hands-on medical staff participation in ...[more]

Shepley office celebrated as model of flexibility, mobility

Monday, 10 December 2007

The flexibility and openness of Shepley Bulfinch’s LEED-certified Boston office was heralded in a front-page article in today’s Banker and Tradesman.

The feature, by columnist and Boston Architectural College professor Jeff Stein, applauded the mobility and horizontal organization of the office, which is designed to foster a collaborative environment and reconfiguration of staff as project demands require. The office, located in Boston’s Seaport District near the World Trade Center, was awarded LEED-CI Silver certification earlier this year.

The office will be on show next May, when Boston hosts the National Convention of the American Institute of Architects. Shepley Bulfinch is a convention sponsor.

Dartmouth-Hitchcock cited as exemplar of flexible design

Tuesday, 1 November 2011

Shepley Bulfinch’s design of Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center is cited as a model of how to design for flexible implementation in Richard De Neufville’s new book, Flexibility in Engineering Design, published by MIT Press in September. The original design of the medical center, which opened in 1991, enabled subsequent vertical and horizontal expansion.

The book offers a high-level overview of why flexibility in design is needed to deliver significantly increased value. It describes in detail methods to identify, select, and implement useful flexibility. For Dartmouth-Hitchcock, that meant development and execution of a ...[more]

The Real Numbers: The Cost of Flexibility

10 March 2008

ASHE Health Facility Planning, Design & Construction conference 2008 - Orlando, FL

Jennifer Aliber, Shepley Bulfinch
Michael Dell'Isola, Faithful + Gould
Pat Banse, SSR

Integrated flexibility plans for multi-user, high tech imaging investments

3 December 2007

Tradeline Academic Medical Centers conference - San Diego, CA

Elise Woodward and Jennifer Aliber, Shepley Bulfinch
Linda Larin and Margaret Lacki, Cardiovascular Center, University of Michigan

Mid-Century libraries: obsolescence or opportunity?

Thursday, 7 April 2016

Angela Watson, AIAWhile the library’s importance to higher education has remained constant, its physical shape has changed dramatically over the course of the last century.

19th century academic libraries reflected the pedagogy and culture of the period: formal buildings with grand spaces and quiet, well-appointed reading rooms. By the middle of the 20th century these buildings faced a new challenge. Unable to respond to cultural shifts, rapid enrollment and collections growth, many of them were abandoned to other programs or demolished, making room for the new “library of the future.” These 20th century “state of ...[more]