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Shepley Bulfinch honored for planning in urban context

Friday, 20 December 2013

The development of new zoning in a sensitive central district adjoining the University of Arizona in Tucson was one of nine Pima County projects honored by the Metropolitan Pima Alliance at its annual Common Ground awards earlier this month. The Main Gate Overlay District received top honors in in the Public Policy category.

The new district establishes a zoning overlay that preserves historic structures within its boundaries while allow new growth and development with the density necessary for the project to succeed. The rezoning, developed as part of the planning and design for the Next and Level student housing developments, was critical to allowing the completion of the two residential towers, ...[more]

LEVEL residential complex takes shape in Tucson

Wednesday, 28 November 2012

Construction is now underway for LEVEL, the student apartment complex close to the University of Arizona in Tucson and the first high rise in the city’s new Main Gate overlay district.

Shepley Bulfinch is completing the 14-story building at 1020 Tyndall Avenue for Campus Acquisitions, one of the country’s leading developers of student housing.  When it opens next year, LEVEL will provide 176 units of luxury student accommodation with amenities that include a rooftop pool and fitness center with views of Tucson, the University of Arizona campus, and the mountains.

“Shepley Bulfinch has a ...[more]

When is preservation historical amnesia?

Wednesday, 25 May 2011

An interesting article from yesterday’s NY Times discusses a new exhibit/critique of preservation by Koolhaas in NY. Nicolai Ouroussoff writes that in the exhibition Mr. Koolhaas “paints a picture of an army of well-meaning but clueless preservationists who, in their zeal to protect the world’s architectural legacies, end up debasing them by creating tasteful scenery for docile consumers while airbrushing out the most difficult chapters of history. The result is a new form of historical amnesia, one that, perversely, only further alienates us from the past.” I would argue this is a fair criticism of styled big-box architecture and other developer driven “luxury” destinations including hotels and shopping malls…

But what ...[more]