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Posts » david meek

Plan for change: future flexibility in OR design

Monday, 28 September 2015

Hybrid OR, Banner Health - University Medical Ctr TucsonScaling up in size, incorporating hybrid technologies, and designing for future flexibility are three aspects that Shepley Bulfinch’s Mario Vieira, David Meek, and Srey Sherman talk about in “Ready for the cutting edge” in the latest issue of Healthcare Design magazine. The article includes a reference to Shepley Bulfinch’s two hybrid ORs completed by the firm as part of a recent surgical services renovation at Banner Health’s University Medical Center in Tucson.

David Meek also discusses mock-ups and hands-on medical staff participation in ...[more]

More than metrics

7 March 2012

ASHE Health Facilities Planning, Development and Construction Conference, Phoenix, AZ

David Meek, Associate AIA, Shepley Bulfinch
Michael Lynch, MD, Head of Emergency Svcs, Concord Hospital
Ray Gerbi, Facilities Consultant

Upgrading the hospital environment

Thursday, 12 August 2010

The latest issue of Healthcare Building Ideas features an interview with healthcare architects Angela Watson and David Meek. In “Systems for Upgrading the Hospital Environment,” this issue’s Build It Right feature, Angela and David discuss recent developments in healthcare design, including strategies for waste management and changing perspectives on indoor air quality for hospitals.

Angela and David’s recent project at Concord Hospital in New Hampshire received LEED certification in 2009, the first hospital in northern New England to do so.

Healthcare Building Ideas article

Positioning for the Unknown: Planning for Medical Centers for the Future

8 May 2006

National Assn of Children's Hospitals and Related Institutions (NACHRI) - Dallas, TX

David Meek with Children's Hospital of Wisconsin

Healthcare design: Getting started in the Big Room

Thursday, 21 January 2016

Banner Big Room in actionDesigning and building large complex projects is becoming more – well, complex. Architects and project teams are constantly looking for ways to control project costs without sacrificing quality or the user experience. Enter the Big Room.

An increasing popular tool for project teams, the Big Room model co-locates designers, contractors, and owners in one space for the duration of a project’s planning, design, and construction process. The idea is that working together in one location promotes transparency, collaboration, and equality and, in the end, delivers a better project for less cost ...[more]

Shepley Bulfinch to design Boston Children’s Hospital tower

Tuesday, 12 May 2015

Conceptual sketch_BCH clinical tower_150 pxShepley Bulfinch, a national leader in pediatric healthcare design, has been selected to design the new clinical care tower for Boston Children’s Hospital. The 11-story, 500,000 square foot building on the Longwood Medical Area campus is the largest in the hospital’s history.

The Clinical Care Tower will address the hospital’s continuing growth in domestic and international patient volume and its delivery of high-level tertiary and quaternary care, adding facility space to improve patient flow and enable operational efficiencies for acute care, critical care, diagnostic, and other ancillary services on the core ...[more]

Tennessee children’s hospital marks construction start

Tuesday, 2 September 2014

ETCH groundbreaking - children with shovelsEast Tennessee Children’s Hospital (ETCH) hosted a groundbreaking ceremony on August 19, marking the start of construction for a major expansion on its Knoxville campus. Community leaders, hospital staff, and young pediatric patients and their families gathered to celebrate the occasion on the site of the planned five-story building.

“It will provide a lot better space for families and a lot better opportunity for us to take good care of their kids,” said hospital CEO Keith Goodwin. “We have to give [our medical staff] the kind of environment that allows ...[more]

Using sustainable design to create a healing environment

Monday, 1 February 2010

Shouldn’t the design of a healthcare facility begin with creating a healthy environment? That’s the argument Angela Watson makes in her article, “LEED by example: Using sustainable design to create a healing environment,” which appears in the January 2010 issue of Healthcare Design magazine. In the article, she discusses the process behind Concord Hospital’s 2008 expansion and renovation, and the hospital’s subsequent receipt of LEED certification, the first in northern New England to be so recognized.

Healthcare Design article